1 in 3 women have or will be a victim of domestic violence in her lifetime. That’s a staggering statistic. Ophelia Metz is one of those women. When she opts to leave her cycle of violence, with her two children, she finds she has no place else to go, but into shelter. Sydell Thomas, a shelter worker, becomes Ophelia’s Advocate upon her arrival. Slowly, it is revealed that Sydell’s life is not unlike the lives of the women who come into shelter — it's closer than she thinks.

developed by: Mario Concina

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK
  • 09/04/2019
    "First, she's calling on the antivirus industry to finally take the threat of stalkerware seriously, after years of negligence and inaction. She'll also ask Apple to take measures to protect iPhone users from stalkerware, given that the company doesn't allow antivirus apps into its App Store. Finally, and perhaps most drastically, she says she'll call on state and federal officials to use their prosecutorial powers to indict executives of stalkerware-selling companies on hacking charges." https://www.wired.com/story/eva-galperin-stalkerware-kaspersky-antivirus/read more »

  • 02/04/2019
    “Australia has no tolerance for perpetrators of violence against women and children. The message is clear: if you’ve been convicted of a violent crime against women or children, you are not welcome in this country, wherever the offense occurred, whatever the sentence.”read more »

  • 01/04/2019
    "This dangerous and deeply-flawed bill mimics many others which have already been deemed unconstitutional. As men who identify as small-government conservatives, we remind you that government is never bigger than when it is inside a woman's body or in her doctor's office. This bill would remove the possibility of women receiving reproductive healthcare before most even know they are pregnant and force many women to undergo unregulated, hidden procedures at great risk to their health."read more »

  • 27/03/2019
    Women had been standing up to harassment in workplaces and on college campuses and the high school girls, who had been witnessing this empowerment, decided they weren’t going to let the issue slide. They felt violated, objectified by classmates they considered their friends. They felt uncomfortable getting up to go to the bathroom, worried that the boys might be scanning them and “editing their decimal points,” said Lee Schwartz, one of the other senior girls on the list.read more »

  • 25/03/2019
    This is a great story that you may have missed and we had to share #metoon https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=1004041439983478read more »

Follow us on Facebook

developed by: Mario Concina